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Almaz Ohene’s 2020 showreel reflecting sexuality education work.

Video Transcript

00:00–00:09

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00:09–00:20

[Almaz Ohene] So this evening is an opportunity to showcase the different ways we can show sexuality bodies and desires on camera without having to be really explicit.

00:20–00:27

So just thinking about the situation and what feels nice and why it feels nice.

00:27–00:35

Kayleigh Daniels Dated is a thirty-year-old darker-skinned Woman of Colour who loves dating and loves having sex…

00:35–00:44

[Georgie Coleridge Cole] …web platform combining sexy stories and sexual health features. She’s a Vogue contributor a Creative Copywriter, what a bio, welcome Almaz.

00:44–00:45

[Almaz Ohene] Hi! Hi!

00:45–00:50

Sexual health is also about how you engage with sex how you feel about sex.

00:50–01:01

So the original French poster is definitely more representative of the film itself, about the girls getting to know each other and, kind of, getting into scrapes together.

01:01–01:14

I’ve noticed that we live in a time and a culture where sexuality is sometimes conflated with sex acts, and a lot of shame is put onto that.

01:14–01:21

[Kem] Why don’t you come over now and I can work my wrist for you.

[Jazz] Kem, it’s 9pm, you still at the shop?

[Kem] Yeah, it was Jess’s last so we threw her little welcome party.

01:21–01:47

[Almaz Ohene] We need to really widen how we describe sex. So there’s so many different sex acts that people get pleasure from, so I think if someone feels like that they’re wanting to move to the next sexual stage, again, just to tell that other person. “Okay, well, I’m ready for this next thing. Let’s have fun. Let’s make it sexy.” And also it should be it should be really fun.

01:47–01:55

…because I think words like penis and vagina a very medical and don’t fit well in entertainment writing.

01:55–01:56

[ALMAZ OHENE PLAYS NOTES ON VIOLIN]

01:57–02:06

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